Gynecological Information

When should I see my provider for health screenings?

Age 18-39

  • Pap – Every 3 years between ages 21-29
  • Pap – Every 5 years with HPV test between ages of 30-65
  • Diabetes Screening – Blood pressure high than 135/80mm Hg, test every 3 years
  • MMR Vaccine – 1 dose if not previously given
  • Tdap Vaccine – 1 dose every 10 years
  • Cholesterol Labs – Not recommended unless risk factors: coronary artery disease, obesity, family history, PCOS

Age 40-49

  • Pap – Every 5 years with HPV test
  • Mammogram* – Every year starting at 40
  • Bone Density Screening – Not recommended unless postmenopausal
  • Diabetes Screening – Blood pressure high than 135/80mm Hg, test every 3 years
  • MMR Vaccine – 1 dose if not previously given
  • Tdap Vaccine – 1 dose every 10 years
  • Cholesterol Labs – Starting at age 45, test every 5 years unless risk factors present: coronary, artery disease, obesity, family history, PCOS

Age 50-64

  • Colonoscopy – Every 10 years
  • Pap – Every 5 years with HPV test
  • Mammogram* – Every year
  • Bone Density Screening – Not recommended unless postmenopausal
  • TSH/Thyroid Screening – Every 5 years, starting at age 50
  • Diabetes Screening – Every 3 years
  • MMR Vaccine – 1 dose if not previously given
  • Tdap Vaccine – 1 dose every 10 years
  • Shingles Vaccine – 1 dose starting at age 60
  • Cholesterol Labs: Every 5 years

Age 65 and Older

  • Colonoscopy – Every 10 years
  • Pap – Not needed unless previous abnormal result
  • Mammogram* – Every year
  • Bone Density Screening – Starting at age 65, every year
  • TSH/Thyroid Screening – Every 5 years
  • Diabetes Screening – Every 3 years
  • MMR Vaccine – 1 dose if not previously given
  • Tdap Vaccine – 1 dose every 10 years
  • Shingles Vaccine – 1 dose if not previously given
  • Cholesterol Labs: Every 5 years

More information:

 

Pre-Op Instructions for In-Office Procedures

Post-Op Instructions for Inoffice Procedures


* Info regarding mammogram – The ACS has strongly reaffirmed that mammography screening saves lives. The new ACS guidelines show that if a woman wants to reduce, as much as possible, her risk of dying of breast cancer, she will choose yearly mammography starting at age 40. A recent study in the British Medical Journal confirms this, showing that early detection of breast cancer is critical for improving breast cancer survival, regardless of therapy advances. Moving away from annual screening of women ages 40 and older puts women’s lives at risk,” said Debra Monticciolo, MD, FACR, chair of the American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Commission. For more information, please click here [http://www.acr.org/About-Us/Media-Center/Press-Releases/2015-Press-Releases/20151020-ACR-SBI-Recommend-Mammography-at-Age-40 ]